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Amphibians of Yellowstone National Park


Yellowstone Tiger Salamander by Bryan Harry - NPS Photo
Amphibians of Yellowstone National Park
Blotched Tiger Salamander Boreal Chorus Frog Boreal Toad Spotted Frog




Blotched Tiger Salamander


Blotched Tiger Salamander
Tiger Salmander by Bryan Harry - NPS Photo
Ambystoma tigrinum melanostictum

The Blotched Tiger Salamander has smooth nonscaly skin, clawless toes, and relatively slow movement. The adults generally have a dark ground color with lighter marbled color patterns along the back and the sides. This species is common where found and is widely distributed throughout Yellowstone.


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Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal Chorus Frog
Boreal Chorus Frog by John William Uhler © Copyright Page Makers, LLC
Pseudacris triseriata maculata

The adult Boreal Chorus Frog are small in size, small toe discs, or pads, on the ends of the toes, relative lack of webbing on the hind feet, and the characteristic three stripes running down the back. They are common and widespread throughout the park.


Boreal Chorus Frog Call (audio file) - Copyright © californiaherps.com


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Boreal Toad

Boreal Toad
Boreal Toad - NPS Photo
Bufo boreas boreas

The adult Boreal Toad has warty skin (with prominent parotoid glands behind each eye), light brown color, and white strip running down the length of the back. They travel in short hops and can often be found far from surface water.


Boreal Toad Call (audio file) - Copyright © californiaherps.com


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Spotted Frog

Spotted Frog
Spotted Frog by John Good - NPS Photo
Rana pretiosa


Spotted Frog
Spotted Frog by John William Uhler © Copyright Page Makers, LLC Spotted Frog by John William Uhler © Copyright Page Makers, LLC
Rana pretiosa

Adult Spotted Frogs have large, fully webbed hind feet, pointed snout, skin with black spots that are sometimes raised, and salmon-colored underside. They frequently leap from a grassy stream bank into nearby water for refuge with a loud "kerplunk" as a person passes by. The distribution is widespread in the park.


Spotted Frog Call (audio file) - © californiaherps.com


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Information from the book: "Amphibians & Reptiles of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks" by Edward D. Koch and Charles R. Peterson. Utilized with permission.




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